The Forestry Manager's House

The Forestry Manager's House

 

The Forestry Manager's house came to the museum in 1924 and was originally from Vantore near Nysted on Lolland. This large building dates from the late 1650s, but the house has been subjected to various changes and extensions over time. When Alex Holch, the chairman of the museum was offered the building,, he did not need much time to consider whether he should accept. This old and rather special building had aroused the chairman's interest, but he was in somewhat of a dilemma.
How should he display the ancient building and what story should it tell? When the house was being demolished and moved to the Open-Air Museum, it was minutely examined and investigated and useful information was obtained from local people about the past history of the house. But in spite of the volume of useful information the move had provided, the interior of the house had been so much altered that the museum decided not to attempt an actual reconstruction and furnishing to represent its origin as an forestry manager's dwelling. Instead, a living room from a Vester Ulslev cottage was incorporated.

 

As the only one of its white-washed, half-timbered houses, the Open-Air Museum has chosen to tar the beams on one side of the mansion. This was done to enhance its beams, as contrary to the other half-timbered houses, the beams are very regular, almost like a decoration on the house.

 

In the mid 1970s, the museum was in a prosperous period and a larger location was needed for the shop. This was formerly in a small wooden building at the entrance, but it no longer served its purpose. Therefore the museum decided to re-position the shop in the forestry manager building where the original fittings from a general grocery store in Rødby were installed as a setting for the shop.
The Forestry Manager's House has functioned as shop and cafeteria ever since.