The Garden House

The Garden House

 

The little labourer's house from Godsted was acquired by the museum in 2003 and stood reconstructed in the museum in 2006. The house was built about 1872 and originally belonged to the Ulriksdal estate. In spite of the relatively short time it was in use, many different people lived in the house. The house was built as a dwelling for the estate workers who had such different trades as assistant herdsman, gardener, milk delivery man, not to mention Swedish and Polish agricultural workers who were hired for sugar beet cultivation. The house was inhabited up until 1999.

 

The layout of the house shows that it is different from the museum's other and older houses because a new, upcoming and revolutionary building technique has been used. The garden house has an iron cooking range with a small baking oven instead of the traditional open fireplace that can be seen in most of the other houses. Therefore there was no subsidiary oven in the other rooms of the house, but stoves that were fed with firewood from the room in which they were situated.

 

The labourer's house was measured, drafted and demolished by the museum's own personnel. Rebuilding began in 2004, undertaken by the museum's staffl, volunteer masons and carpenters and with assistance from the municipality of Maribo. Whilst the reconstruction was under way, the museum started a cultural/historical investigation of the property. The purpose of the investigation was to establish the year the house was built, describe its lay out and organisation of the rooms and to obtain information about the people who had lived in the house over the years.

 

For special functions, the wood fired range is lit and used to bake bread and cook pancakes.